Friday, July 24, 2009

Simply Resistable


For more than a decade the squash borers have held the upper hand here. Every non chemical attempt at control has come up short. This year the squash was planted far away from the garden. So far the borer moth has not found my plants. Neither have the pollinators. Beautiful bushy plants with upward pointing open blossoms and not a bee to be seen. With no pollination the baby squash shrivel and turn to mush.


Here is part of the problem. The squash occupy a corner near the woods surrounded by acres of milkweed. Heady fragrance from these flowers fills the air. Bees are all over the milkweed blossoms. A path walk now features so much buzzing that it is a little unsettling. The bees are happy working the abundant pollen source so they are docile. We do look for an empty flower before sniffing. This is one of my favorite times of the year. The scent from these flowers is pleasant beyond description. If this fragrance were bottled in perfume, I would likely find it irresistible. The common view of milkweed is limited to a weed used by Monarch butterflies. We see so much more. Some is even allowed to grow in the garden. Squash is for sale along the roadside. I will be happy to buy my squash and walk near the sweet scented, bee drawing milkweed.

4 comments:

Landscaping Design Girl said...

Thanks for sharing.

Msrobin said...

I saw a squash borer moth on mine, but no sign of damage yet. I couldn't find any organic treatment, so I'm just waiting it out and enjoying the zucchini while I can.

Sylvia said...

I know that most years you use the squash blossoms in recipes. Can you still use the blossoms without the pollination happening?

Becky said...

I'm afraid we don't have nearly enough squash planted to have stuffed squash blossoms this year.The blossoms could be used without the pollination happening, but with the sunny weather we are finally getting, I'm hopeful that we will get some squash.